July 19, 2015 | Posted in Chess Lectures | By

Monday, July 20 IM David Vigorito Prophylactic Mating Attack (middlegame, tactics)
After an unusual opening transposition, a highly unbalanced middlegame is reached. Here we see how a flank attack can work well even when the center is not closed. The key to success here is always remembering to think, ‘what can my opponent do?’.

Tuesday, July 21 IM Bill Paschall Classic Karpov, Part 1 (openings, tactics)
Karpov gains the bishop pair and a spacial advantage in the opening. Timman misplays in some early situations, deploying the wrong knight to b4 as well as deferring e6, thus allowing Karpov a very disruptive pawn sacrifice. Black is unable to coordinate or generate counter-play in this sharp situation with king his castled long. Karpov brilliantly sacrifices his queen and gains a devastatingly powerful passed pawn, which is the key to his victory. The former World Champion displays excellent technique in this imbalanced endgame.

Wednesday, July 22 FM Dennis Monokroussos Remembering Walter Browne (openings, tactics)
Walter Browne died this June, and as one of the legends of U.S. chess and a world-class player in the 1970s and early 1980s, he deserves to be remembered. In this game he shows his mettle, crushing one of the world’s┬ábest players. He found a brilliant idea against his opponent’s opening idea, and finished the game with an impressive attack. Browne’s high-energy play may have made it look easy, but it wasn’t!

Thursday, July 23 GM Leonid Kritz Time Trouble (tactics)
Even though every game of the World Champion is interesting to watch, this one is something special. And it is not because of chess attributes. Yes, Carlsen played very strong and outplayed his opponent as he does so often, but then… Mistakenly, the world champ expected additional 15 minutes after move 60, but he did not get them and… lost on time in a position where he was winning by force. That does not happen too often. Besides, the most important moment of the game is the idea that almost always you should play h5 once your opponent plays h4 with the idea of weakening your king. Topalov did not do it and got in trouble in a position that was absolutely OK.

Friday, July 24 GM Eugene Perelshteyn Play the Endgame Like Kamsky! (endgame, strategy)
Learn endgames from the best! Kamsky slowly outplays his younger opponent in what looks like a equal endgame. Where did White go wrong? Watch and learn how to think in terms of “schemes” and plans and how to attack in the endgame!