November 23, 2015 | Posted in Chess Lectures | By

Monday, November 23 GM Nadya Kosintseva QGD Ragozin Defense, Part 2: Why Most Players Take on d5 First (openings, strategy)
Why do most players take on d5 first and then play Bg5, rather than develop the bishop immediately? The important difference between taking on d5 and playing Bg5 versus playing Bg5 right away is that Black has an additional opportunity after 5.Bg5, namely he can capture the pawn on c4 and play this position. Even though Black gives up some initiative and White has certain compensation for the sacrificed material, the position of Black turns out to be more than just playable – there is enough potential for him to defend and even fight for counterplay.

Tuesday, November 24 IM Bill Paschall Boris Spassky’s Spasstacular Attacking Miniatures, Part 7 (tactics, strategy)
Spassky shows his prowess against the Winawer French, Black plays a bit passively in the opening and Spassky takes the initiative with active pieces and the bishop pair. Spassky finishes his attack with a classic rook lift and sacrifices said rook decisively.

Wednesday, November 25 IM Dennis Monokroussos A Wild Shootout Ends In A Draw (tactics)
I’ve played my share of crazy games over the years, but this may be the tactically richest game of them all. Neither I nor my opponent were fully up to the challenge – this won’t be so surprising once you see the game for yourself – but we both played with energy and imagination, and produced a game that will at least entertain if not instruct. (Though I hope a little instruction will seep in as well.)

Thursday, November 26 GM Eugene Perelshteyn The Unknown Side of Young Kasparov:  Positional Masterpiece & Principle of Two Weaknesses!  Part 2 (strategy, endgame)
Once more, we see the eighteen year old genius from Baku follow in the style of his coach, Mikhal Botvinnik. Gary plays slow, boring, positional chess against the IQP. What looks like a game heading for a draw is quickly spoiled but a slight inaccuracy by Black, weakening the queenside pawns. The rest is yet another lesson on the principle of two weaknesses! Watch and learn and be surprised by mature positional understanding from young Gary.

Friday, November 27 IM David Vigorito Inside Coverage of the USCL 2015 – part 17 (opening)

Continuing coverage of the U.S. Chess League sees me facing off against veteran IM Jonathan Schroer of the Carolina team. I use the Reti Opening and get a position that I have had many times, but with colors reversed (London System). So this lecture should also be of interest to King’s Indian players. This is a good system to play to avoid a lot of theory while still gearing up for a good middlegame fight. It’s ok if the position is equal if you can play it better than your opponent!