July 4, 2016 | Posted in Chess Lectures | By

Monday, July 4 IM Valeri Lilov Preesure and Attack (strategy, middlegame)
Pressuring the opponent always feels quite good. Bobby Fischer used to say he most likes the moment where his opponent’s ego is broken due to the huge pressure he has endured. Many players try to capture the right steps to achieving this pressure but very few can actually keep it for more than a few moves. How to do it successfully? Check this video to learn more!

Tuesday, July 5 IM Bill Paschall My Chess Comeback 2016! Part 1 (openings)
White plays a King’s Indian attack formation against the Slav; a safe, but essentially harmless opening if black defends accurately. Black is able to keep the position fairly closed, despite giving up the bishop pair with 13…Bxf3. Problems surface as black plays passively in the middlegame with moves such as 20..Ng6 and 23…Nf8. In time pressure, Black becomes overly optimistic with the reckless 36…g5 ?? Black is suddenly facing the bishop pair and a dangerous pawn majority on the kingside , when further resistance is impossible .

Wednesday, July 6 FM Dennis Monokroussos Chess’s Past Still The Present Against Its Future (openings)
In his incredible career, Viktor Korchnoi defeated nine world chess champions (though not necessarily when they were world champions), and that includes reigning champ Magnus Carlsen. Carlsen was only 14 at the time, you might say, but by then he had been a grandmaster for more than a year, and in any case Korchnoi was 73 years old! The game was instructive throughout, even if the game’s conclusion turned out to be an anti-climax of sorts. But there’s a lesson there too; chess players must exercise vigilance in more ways than one!

Thursday, July 7 GM Leonid Kritz Avoid Overly Optimistic Sacrifices! (openings, tactics)
After the opening Black got a very solid position, a typical situation for this type of pawn structure where White has a symbolic advantage, but Black’s position looks like a castle with no holes. However, with 17….c5 Eljanov decided to give up a pawn to get some virtual counterplay. His view was too optimistic, though, and after a couple of moves it was clear that White has a pawn for free. The young Chinese player did not have any trouble converting his advantage.

Friday, July 8 GM Eugene Perelshteyn Lesson From My Komodo Match, Part 4: Play Actively When Possible! (openings, tactics)
In the final game of Handicap match, Komodo sacrifices a piece for a pawn! This the biggest of the odds so far for GM Perelshteyn. Can he punish the best chess engine in the world? Watch and enjoy!