May 12, 2014 | Posted in Chess Lectures | By

Monday, May 12 IM David Vigorito An Expert Refutes a King’s Indian (opening, tactics)
My lower-rated but experienced opponent makes me rethink an old pet line of mine in the Samisch King’s Indian. A sophisticated strategic plan brings me to the brink of disaster but I manage to turn the tables in mutual time pressure.

Tuesday, May 13 IM Bill Paschall Karjakin’s Classic Nimzo opening (strategy)
Karjakin plays black in a Nimzo-Queen’s Indian hybrid. White plays an old line with Bg5 and Qc2, but varies for the standard line with the highly unusual move 9.Be5. ¬†White plays an interesting plan with d5 and Nd4, but fails to kick the e4 knight out at the right moment with f3. The position is a dream for Black with 2 well centralized knights against 2 inactive bishops. A classic Nimzo where Black had to be careful with his king in the center. Karjakin navigates well and calculates the final combination brilliantly.

Wednesday, May 14 FM Dennis Monokroussos The Queen’s Gambit and Friends. Part 10: The Not-So-Harmless Queenless QGA (opening)
With queens coming off the board and an almost completely symmetrical position it would seem at first glance that the Queen’s Gambit accepted line with 7.dxc5 is both dull and insipid, and a prescription for a short draw. It is more drawish than some other lines, that’s true, but a lot of life there. White is playing for two results, and some great players have been unable to neutralize White’s pressure. In this game, we see very convincingly how easy it is for White to whip up some serious pressure, as Carlsen crushes Nisipeanu in just 31 moves.

Thursday, May 15 GM Leonid Kritz The Game That Decided the Candidates Tournament (opening, endgame)

Friday, May 16 LM Dana Mackenzie Terrific Teens, Episode 2: Attacking in Slow Motion (strategy)
One of the hardest things to do after sacrificing material is to play slowly and patiently. In this remarkable performance, the young Polish GM Dariusz Swiercz plays a fascinating slow-motion attack. The game nicely illustrates the concept of paralysis. After completely tying up White’s pieces, Black can take all the time he wants to bring in the reinforcements – in this case, a pawn that strikes the decisive blow.

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