November 4, 2015 | Posted in Chess Lectures | By

Monday, November 2 IM David Vigorito Inside Coverage of the USCL 2015 – part 16 (opening, endgame)
This game shows some of the difficulties involved in getting a fight against a peaceful-minded opponent. The King’s Indian usually leads to sharp play, but in here my opponent is quick to remove as many pieces as he can from the board. he probably goes too far and loses a pawn, but after I make a lackluster decision the chance to torture my opponent goes out the window and he easily gets his much-coveted draw.

Tuesday, November 3 IM Bill Paschall Boris Spassky’s Spastacular Attacking Miniatures, Part 4 (opening, tactics)
A key game in the Najdorf that helped to derive the name of the variation of the Najdorf in question, the Gothenburg. Spassky mixes his usual aggressive but positional style of development with a vicious sacrificial attack. Black plays the risky idea 9….g5 and fails to find a safe haven for his king. Tremendously creative and deeply planned attacking play demonstrated by Spassky. There was no way out for black.

Wednesday, November 4 FM Dennis Monokroussos Ljubo Living on the Edge (opening)
When analyzing the game in 1980, Jan Timman described this as the best game of the past 20 years. I wouldn’t go that far, but it’s a wonderful battle where creative attacking play comes up against inspired defense. Only at the last critical moment does Ulf Andersson’s defensive prowess fail him, and Ljubomir Ljubojevic goes on to win a classic.

Thursday, November 4 GM Eugene Perelshteyn Lessons from World Cup: What Happens When You Surrender the Center (opening)
We all know the value of the center. But even Super GMs sometimes get carried away and forget about this vital area of the board. Watch how Karjakin slips and allows Svilder to take over the initiative with a timely …d5! break. He makes it look easy!

Friday, November 5 GM Bryan Smith A Little Vignette from Frankfurt, 1930 (endgame)
In this video, GM Smith shows how a Soviet analyst from the early twentieth century, Nikolai Grigoriev, uncovered fantastic depths in a seemingly simple position.┬áStarting from an endgame with knight and five pawns each – including protected passers – important and oft times surprising aspects of knight endings, and then king and pawn endings, and even possible resulting queen endings are explored and explained.