May 22, 2017 | Posted in Chess Lectures | By

Monday, May 22 IM Valeri Lilov Structural Domination (strategy, middlegame)
In this lecture, IM Lilov explores the key values of structure and restriction. These two concepts are very closely related to each other as a good pawn and piece structure guarantees a space command and limitations over the opponent.

Tuesday, May 23 IM Bill Paschall The Reemergence of Aronian (opening, strategy)

Levon Aronian has come tantalizingly close to the very top of the chess world in the 21st century. He clearly has the talent to be a challenger for the World Championship , but he has faltered in the important Candidates tournaments. Could this great master be on the verge of a breakthrough? In the 2017 Grenke Chess Classic, Levon dominated the event ahead of Magnus Carlsen. Is this event and the following game proof he has what it takes?

Wednesday, May 24 FM Dennis Monokroussos Fool Me Once, Shame On Me; Fool Me Twice… (opening traps)

It’s best to learn from others’ mistakes, but sometimes we have to learn from our own errors instead. Sometimes, though, we don’t even manage to do that, even if we are one of the very best chess players in the world. That’s what happened to the great Akiba Rubinstein, who fell for a certain trick in a 1928 game against Max Euwe, and then made the same type of error in a very similar position just 18 months later against Alexander Alekhine. Let’s learn two lessons from these games: first, to avoid the trap (or to alertly catch our opponents in it); secondly, to pay attention to our errors so we don’t repeat them!

Thursday, May 25 IM David Vigorito Nakamura Nails the Hammer (opening, strategy)

Facing Nakamura’s sharp King’s Indian Defense, Jon Ludwig Hammer goes for a quiet line which was recommended in a popular repertoire book. Nakamura has a nice little novelty prepared. Hammer goes for what looks like a safe, symmetrical position, but as if by magic the Black position expands and sweeps away his opponent.

Friday, May 26 GM Nadya Kosintseva The Spectacular Tactics of Wilhelm Steinitz (tactics)

In this lecture, I would like you to watch one of the most brilliant games of Wilhelm Steinitz, who was the first official World Chess Champion. It was played 5 years before his death and considered to be one of the brightest achievements by Steinitz as a tactician. This game is a must-see classic due to its well-calculated and spectacular mating combination – after which his opponent “is reported to have made no comment but to have put on his hat and quietly walked home…”.